Cameroon starts world-first malaria mass vaccine rollout

BBC | The world’s first routine vaccine programme against malaria has started in Cameroon, in a move projected to save thousands of children’s lives across Africa.

The symbolic first jab was given to a baby girl named Daniella at a health facility near Yaoundé on Monday.

It comes after successful pilot campaigns in Kenya, Ghana and Malawi.

Cameroon is offering the RTS,S vaccine free of charge to all infants up to the age of six months old.

Patients require a total of four doses.

The jab is known to be effective in at least 36% of cases, according to US researchers, meaning it could save over one in three lives.

While the rollout is undoubtedly a relief and a life-saver, its relatively low efficacy rate means that it is not a “silver bullet”, argues Willis Akhwale at End Malaria Council Kenya.

But for medics it is an important “additional tool” in the the fight against malaria, says Cameroonian doctor Shalom Ndoula who helped to lead the rollout in his country.

“We have a capacity to considerably reduce the number of cases and deaths from malaria and accelerate the elimination of the disease,” he told the BBC.

Development of the RTS,S vaccine has taken 30 years of research by the British drug-maker GSK.

The World Health Organization, which approved the vaccine, hailed the launch in Cameroon as a historic moment in the global fight against the mosquito-borne disease.

Twenty other countries aim to roll out the programme this year, according to the global vaccine alliance, Gavi. Among them are Burkina Faso, Liberia, Niger and Sierra Leone.

The WHO says Cameroon records about six million malaria cases every year, with 4,000 deaths in health facilities — most of them children below five.

Six-month-old children in 42 districts with the greatest rates of morbidity and mortality will receive four doses until the age of two.

In 2021, Africa accounted for 95% of malaria cases globally and about 96% of related deaths.

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One comment

  1. Just divert only 5% percent of all the funds used in the production of weapons of mass destruction, to malaria research and the world will have a first class malaria vaccine with 99 percent efficiency. The world is just greedy about this project. Scientists spent 30 years in lab research to achieve only 36% efficiency… US spends less than that time with far much money to achieve almost a 100% success rate on its Patriot missile air defense – May be it can hit a fly in the sky at any altitude. Russia spends far more money to manufacture the SAM defense system to track any flying object and shot it down with almost a 100% accuracy. Israel’s Iron dome is unbeatable in the air… Above all this, Malaria is still unbeatable in the world.