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This documentary tells the story of Africa’s longest internet shutdown

Quartz | This documentary tells the story of Africa’s longest internet shutdown

The story of those days is now the subject of a new documentary from Blacked Out Africa, a collective that says it aims to make more documentaries about shutdowns in Africa. Blacked Out: The Shutdown recounts the details of the longest total internet blackout in Africa. Starting from Jan.

17 until April 20, officials in Cameroon cut off the internet without prior notice, while pressuring mobile operators to flick the switch off on their customers.

Through interviews with journalists, activists, innovators, and government officials, the 43-minute film also highlights how president Paul Biya’s government came to view the internet and social media as a “new form of terrorism.”

The story of those days is now the subject of a new documentary from Blacked Out Africa, a collective that says it aims to make more documentaries about shutdowns in Africa. Blacked Out: The Shutdown recounts the details of the longest total internet blackout in Africa.

Starting from Jan. 17 until April 20, officials in Cameroon cut off the internet without prior notice, while pressuring mobile operators to flick the switch off on their customers.

Through interviews with journalists, activists, innovators, and government officials, the 43-minute film also highlights how president Paul Biya’s government came to view the internet and social media as a “new form of terrorism.”

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7 comments

  1. I stopped watching for two reasons: after hearing the voice and a quote by the bigot called Trump who is condemning acts by authoritarian regimes except for North Korea, Saudi Arabia and Russia without forgetting his own actions since he came to power and also after hearing the voice of a child being exploited into reading something absolutely inappropriate for someone that obvious low age, whether true or false. That introduction alone tells me a lot about the ethics of whoever decided to put that crap together. The Cameroon public would have been better served if the author(s) would have adopted a more journalistic approach while realizing this so called documentary. If I had to vote using a 10-star system, my vote would be zero star.

    • What you think about who tells the story is immaterial.
      What’s important is the message, not the messenger. When the true history of Cameroon is told it will be said that the government shot itself in the head by actual ovation what was an unspoken marginalisation of Anglophones.
      Who knows? Cutting the Internet in anglophone Cameroon may be an attempt to kill the budding silicon mountain industry and perhaps move the centre of IT in cameroon from Buea to Kribi. West Cameroon companies on my mind.
      Wata NA wata

    • By actualising not “ovation”

    • It is impossible for a story teller to please everyone. But this not fiction and of course the truth about the internet shot down in Southern Cameroons is bound to make a lot of people uncomfortable. Biased people ultimately find fault with the storyteller. You cannot critique facts. Judge the filmmaker all you want but the facts of the matter can not be denied

  2. Fools paradise.

    • It is impossible for a story teller to please everyone. But this not fiction and of course the truth about the internet shot down in Southern Cameroons is bound to make a lot of people uncomfortable. Biased people ultimately find fault with the storyteller. You cannot critique facts. Judge the filmmaker all you want but the facts of the matter can not be denied.

  3. People have not been in school for about 3 years, you people are talking about internet. Cut the damn internet …..something