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Cameroon: The first two internet exchange points have been put into service in 2017

Business in Cameroon | The internet exchange points of Yaoundé and Douala, whose construction began in 2016, have been commissioned this year, internal sources at the ministry of post and telecommunication revealed.

According to our sources, Cameroon’s government invested CFA1.417 billion for the development of these infrastructures whose main objective is the reduction of internet costs in the country by avoiding connections through foreign countries’ points.

“The construction of these internet exchange points allows not only to save currencies but also to improve service quality, while reducing at the same time latency periods and the price paid by the end user”, a telecom expert explained.

Incidentally, internet users in Cameroon are yet to feel the impact of this small technological revolution. Let’s note that according to different reports, internet prices are less competitive in Cameroon than in other African countries which are at the same level of development.

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3 comments

  1. An Internet exchange point (IX or IXP) is a physical infrastructure through which Internet service providers (ISPs) and content delivery networks (CDNs) exchange Internet traffic between their networks (autonomous systems).The primary purpose of an IXP is to allow networks to interconnect directly, via the exchange, rather than through one or more third-party networks. The advantages of the direct interconnection are numerous, but the primary reasons are cost, latency, and bandwidth.
    Traffic passing through an exchange is typically not billed by any party, whereas traffic to an ISP’s upstream provider is.The direct interconnection, often located in the same city as both networks, avoids the need for data to travel to other cities (potentially on other continents) to get from one ne

    • The direct interconnection, often located in the same city as both networks, avoids the need for data to travel to other cities (potentially on other continents) to get from one network to another, thus reducing latency.The third advantage, speed, is most noticeable in areas that have poorly developed long-distance connections. ISPs in these regions might have to pay between 10 or 100 times more for data transport than ISPs in North America, Europe or Japan.When an IXP incurs operating costs, they are typically shared among all of its participants.At the more expensive exchanges, participants pay a monthly or annual fee, usually determined by the speed of the port or ports which they are using .Fees are based on volume of traffic.

    • Nice… Save me the time to go Google it myself.